Integration of Polar-Orbiting and Geostationary Satellite Information in Forecast and Sea Ice Operations at NWS Anchorage (92)

Michael Lawson, National Weather Service Anchorage Forecast Office, Anchorage, AK

 

Abstract:

Integration of Polar-Orbiting and Geostationary Satellite Information in Forecast and Sea Ice Operations at NWS Anchorage

Michael T. Lawson

National Weather Service, Anchorage, Alaska

ABSTRACT

Polar-orbiting satellite products are increasingly useful at high latitudes, where the amount of imagery is significantly greater than lower latitudes. Data sparse locations, such as Alaska, benefit from the pole-to-pole coverage these satellites provide. Imagery from Himiwari-8 also gives Alaska forecasters a look into the future of high spatial/temporal resolution geostationary satellite products. NWS Anchorage uses a diverse selection of products to monitor a variety of meteorological conditions including cyclogenesis, low stratus/fog, blowing dust, winds, and sea ice. Forecasters at NWS Anchorage continually collaborate with NASA SPoRT on evaluation of Snowfall Rate Product and RGB imagery, as well as with other agency partners. In addition, the combination of geostationary and polar-orbiting imagery, including the newly launched NOAA-20, gives forecasters a glimpse of single and multi-channel products that are expected with the launch of GOES-S in March of 2018. An evaluation of these proxy data conducted by NWS Anchorage has given forecasters advanced knowledge of product interpretation, so they can be prepared for GOES-17 on day one. The uniqueness of Himiwari-8 and polar-orbiting data in Alaska will be shown in this poster. Examples intended for display will encompass Synthetic Aperture Radar, Day/Night Band, Daytime/Nighttime microphysics imagery, Air Mass Product, Snowfall Rate Product, and NUCAPS soundings.