Operational Utilization of Advected Layered Precipitable Water and other Emerging Datasets to Detect Flash Floods in the Greater Kansas City Metropolitan Area: A Review of the 2016 and 2017 Flash Flood Seasons (139)

Jonathan Welsh, National Weather Service, Pleasant Hill, MO

Christopher Gitro, National Weather Service

Scott Watson, National Weather Service

 

Abstract:

 

Operational Utilization of Advected Layered Precipitable Water and other Emerging Datasets to Detect Flash Floods in the Greater Kansas City Metropolitan Area: A Review of the 2016 and 2017 Flash Flood Seasons

Jonathan J. Welsh, Christopher M. Gitro, Scott A. Watson

NOAA/NWS National Weather Service, Kansas City, Missouri

ABSTRACT

Multiple flash flood events have occurred within the Kansas City, Missouri area in both 2016 and 2017. In 2017 alone, two events met or exceeded 100 year flood thresholds within the Kansas City metropolitan area. With the introduction of the advected layered precipitable water data source from the Colorado Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, new detection techniques for precursor synoptic signals for flash flooding are readily available. The layered nature of the data provides additional insight into the vertical depth of moisture fields, along with overall pattern trends leading into flash flood events. Observable layered contributions also provide the opportunity to track multiple sources of moisture throughout the vertical depth of the atmosphere. These quantifiable contributions may highlight favorable synoptic and global scale moisture sources for ideal flash flood setups. Layered precipitable water data will be analyzed during multiple flash flood events within the Kansas City area in 2016 and 2017 in order to unveil overall synoptic trends and overlapping patterns to provide key signals indicative of future flash flood patterns over the Kansas City area.